Tag Archives: tuberculosis

Four nurses pose for smiling candid photos outdoors. October 06

Fresh Air and the White Plague

Circulating Now welcomes guest blogger Cynthia Connolly. Dr. Connolly is Associate Professor of Nursing at the Barbara Bates Center for the Study of the History of Nursing, University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing. She is a pediatric nurse and historian. She studies the history of children’s health and social welfare policy and practice in the […]

An embossed gold shield featureing a man threatening a skeleton with a weapon labeled Microbe Killer. October 09

Radam’s Microbe Killer: Advertising Cures for Tuberculosis

In nineteenth century America, tuberculosis accounted for nearly one out of every ten deaths. Known most commonly as “consumption,” this disease was dreaded across society because it affected all age groups, cut across social and class lines, was incurable, and often resulted in long debilitating illnesses. To explore the social effects of tuberculosis, a group […]

A pie chart showing rates of mortality for different causes for 1907; Tuberculosis ranks first at 21%. October 07

Gathering and Interpreting Data about Tuberculosis in the U.S.

In nineteenth century America, tuberculosis accounted for nearly one out of every ten deaths. Known most commonly as “consumption,” this disease was dreaded across society because it affected all age groups, cut across social and class lines, was incurable, and often resulted in long debilitating illnesses. To explore the social effects of tuberculosis, a group […]

October 05

Medical Research about Tuberculosis: Virginia Perspectives on Koch’s Cure

In nineteenth century America, tuberculosis accounted for nearly one out of every ten deaths. Known most commonly as “consumption,” this disease was dreaded across society because it affected all age groups, cut across social and class lines, was incurable, and often resulted in long debilitating illnesses. To explore the social effects of tuberculosis, a group […]

Tuberculosis notice listing danger signs. March 24

World Tuberculosis Day

By Ginny A. Roth On March 24, 1882, a medical milestone was achieved. Dr. Robert Koch reported his discovery that Mycobacterium tuberculosis was the cause of a disease that was responsible for the deaths of one out of every seven people living in the United States and Europe. This was a critical step towards the effective […]

1937 Christmas Seals December 24

Season’s Greetings

By Ginny A. Roth   The name Emily Bissell may not strike a chord with most people, but you can thank her for introducing colorful and festive Christmas Seals to the United States that have been produced every year since 1907. This Christmas Seal from 1937 marked the 30th year that the seals were produced, […]

Still from a black and white film, a priest speaks to a woman in a headscarf. August 26

Medicine, Morality, Faith, and Film

By Sophie Lipman Religion and science, two concepts sometimes viewed as incompatible today, were seen by many in the 1930s and ‘40s as mutually supportive components for promoting the health of Americans. During a time of political and economic calamity—the conflict in Europe, the Depression at home—the nation’s health was threatened as well. Venereal disease, […]