Tag Archives: France

An illustration of wo men dueling with swords under Spanish moss hung oak trees. August 25

Medical Identity and Ethnicity in 19th-Century New Orleans

Dr. Amy Wiese Forbes spoke today at the National Library of Medicine on “Medical Identity and Ethnicity in Nineteenth-Century New Orleans.” Dr. Forbes is Associate Professor of History and Director of European Studies at Millsaps College. Circulating Now interviewed her about her work. Circulating Now: Tell us a little about yourself. Where are you from? […]

Nurses wait on patients in hospital beds. July 14

AFS and American Volunteerism in World War I

Circulating Now welcomes guest blogger Nicole J. Milano, Head Archivist and Historical Publications Editor at the Archives of the American Field Service and AFS Intercultural Programs. Recently Nicole’s research brought her to NLM to explore the history of volunteerism from World War I to the present for a series of lesson plans in celebration of […]

August 13

The 1889 Russian Flu in the News

In November 1889, a rash of cases of influenza-like-illness appeared in St. Petersburg, Russia. Soon, the “Russia Influenza” spread across Europe and the world. This outbreak is being researched by teams of Virginia Tech students as a case-study of the relationship between the spread of the disease and the spread of reporting about the disease. […]

Detail of map of Europe. August 11

Mapping the 1889-1890 Russian Flu

In November 1889, a rash of cases of influenza-like-illness appeared in St. Petersburg, Russia. Soon, the “Russia Influenza” spread across Europe and the world. This outbreak is being researched by teams of Virginia Tech students as a case-study of the relationship between the spread of the disease and the spread of reporting about the disease. […]

A vignette photograph of Mary Putnam Jacobi. July 29

The Question of Rest for Women

By Susan Speaker The Question of Rest for Women During Menstruation is an extended version of an essay that won Dr. Jacobi the Harvard Medical School’s esteemed Boylston Prize in 1876. It was a significant event, as Jacobi was the first woman ever to win the competition. Beyond that, however, the book gives us a […]

Colored newspaper illustration of Marie Curie in a lab. July 03

The Revolutionary who Discovered Radium

By Elizabeth Fee Albert Einstein said “I have always admired . . Marie Curie. Not only did she do outstanding work in her lifetime, and not only did she help humanity greatly by her work, but she invested all her work with the highest moral quality. All of this she accomplished with great strength, objectivity, […]

Surgeons operate under a tent while soldiers in fatigues look on. June 06

Dr. Swan writes from Normandy, 1944

By Susan Speaker “Operation Overlord”—the invasion of France’s Normandy coast that began on June 6, 1944—was the largest amphibious military operation in the history of warfare, and the turning point for the Allied Forces in World War II. Among the thousands of troops that waded onto the beaches, there were over forty surgical teams from […]